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Science Progress in Print

Science Progress articles, reports, podcasts, and other content are now available exclusively online. See below for our past work in print.

Print Edition

Science Progress ran two semi-annual print edition magazines in 2008 and 2009. Contact editor@scienceprogress.org to obtain a print copy. All articles are now available in HTML and .pdf formats:

Issue 2: Science’s Troubled Legacy (Winter-Spring 2008-2009)

Issue 1 (Spring-Summer 2008)

The Body Politic: The Battle Over Science in America

Body Politic Cover

While no one can deny that science undergirds the American Dream, it has long been fertile terrain for the “culture wars.” Along with arguing the pros and cons of abortion and healthcare, policymakers must now grapple with scientific advancements that raise questions about what it means to be human: we’ve decoded the genome, but should we modify it to enhance certain “de- sirable” traits? If we can, should we prolong life at any cost? Will we soon be counting robots, cyborgs, and chimeras among our friends and family?
The first book to unpack our love/hate relationship with science from our country’s origins to today, Jonathan Moreno’s The Body Politic is essential reading for science buffs and concerned citizens alike.

Science Next: Innovation for the Common Good from the Center for American Progress

Science Next Cover

After eight years during which science and innovation took a backseat to politics and ideology, the Obama administration has ushered in a new era. In that spirit, Editor-in-Chief Jonathan Moreno and former CAP Senior Fellow Rick Weiss teamed up with the Bellevue Literary Press to produce Science Next: Innovation for the Common Good from the Center for American Progress.
This is the informed citizen’s essential guide to science policy: an accessible compendium of essays on how public knowledge and understanding of science as an engine of progress will reveal solutions to today’s most pressing problems, including climate change, national security, and the need for access to affordable health care. Read the introduction, “Time for Science to Reclaim Its Progressive Roots,” or order the book online.